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Wood stoves are becoming increasingly popular in the USA, with more than 10 million homes using them regularly, according to the U.S. Energy Information Agency. Anyone investing in a new wood stove needs to take many factors into consideration before parting with their money. This is particularly true for seniors who need to make sure that the stove they choose is not only easy to use, but safe and practical as well. Following a few simple tips will make it a lot easier to find the most senior-suitable wood stove on the market.

Size does matter

One of the most important considerations when choosing a wood stove is its size. When choosing a wood stove for a senior it is important to determine what exactly it will be used for. Will its primary purpose be to heat the home, prepare food on, or to create ambiance? If the senior is living in a relatively small home, there is no need for an over-sized oven. In fact, installing a wood stove that is too big will waste fuel, pollute the air, and even result in a severe fire hazard thanks to a creosote build-up.  It is always best to pick the smallest stove that can heat the required space efficiently as this will allow you to burn a clean, hot fire without overheating your living area and posing a threat to your health and well-being.

There is no need to break the bank

While there are undoubtedly woodstoves on the market that carry a very hefty price tag, there are also plenty of more affordable and equally as effective stoves available. Many seniors are already faced with several budgeting challenges and investing in an overpriced stove will just exacerbate the concern. Draw up a budget and stick to it. Do not be cajoled into spending extra money on fitting and features you do not need. A top-of-the-range ultra-modern wood stove may look nice but at the end of the day it will, more than likely, not warm your room or boil your water any better than a much more affordable model.

Don’t disregard aesthetics completely

Although a wood stove’s overall performance is of greater importance than its design, aesthetics should not be disregarded completely as they can be linked to distinct benefits for senior owners. Stoves typically either stand on legs or a pedestal. Some stoves even have adjustable legs which are ideal for wheelchair users. Wood stoves generally boast a single door, a double door, or a side door.  A glass door allows you to keep an eye on your wood levels inside without causing a disruption to the combustion process. Stoves with flat tops are easier to cook on and pose less of a burn hazard than those with removable burners.

There are many benefits to owning a wood stove. As long as proper research is conducted before making a purchase, a senior can safely enjoy the wonderful warmth emitted by a cozy wood-burning stove. 

1.9 percent of US households still use wood for their heating needs as opposed to electricity or utility gas, according to a report by the US Census Bureau. Many people still rely on wood not only since it's usually cheaper than the other alternatives but also since it is better for the environment. While woodburning stoves are mostly installed in the living room or kitchen, you can find them anywhere in a home including in a bedroom, home office, or even your mancave. If you are lucky enough to have a mancave, adding a woodburning stove is a surefire way to make it so much better than it already is, especially if you live in an area that gets cold from time to time. However, being an addition that could potentially be dangerous, you must be careful to ensure that you install it correctly. 

Choosing an ideal spot for your woodstove 

You must make the decision of where you're going to be putting your stove in your mancave long before going out to buy one. Since a wood stove is a space heater, you want to have it installed in a central position where it can heat every corner of your mancave. To maximize its efficiency, pick a spot with good insulation so that the heat from the woodstove is not lost through windows or walls. You also want to install it in a spot where it won't cause your TV, gaming console, or other electrical appliances in your mancave to overheat. Keep in mind that your woodstove will require a chimney, which ideally should be vertical and with as few bends as possible.

Make it multifunctional

One of the things that people love most about mancaves is that they give you a safe spot where you can hide away from the rest of the world and be alone for as long as you want. To further cement this feeling in your mancave, you can choose a woodstove that allows you to cook on it. There are various wood stove options that are specifically designed to allow people to cook while still performing their primary function of heating, but any with a flat surface on top that's large enough to hold a cooking pot will do. This addition can transform your mancave from a place you hang out in from time to time to a prepper's dream space where you can live, eat, have fun, and stay warm for as long as you need to, even when there are power outages. 

Choosing a wood stove 

After identifying an ideal spot in your mancave to install your woodstove, the next step is to choose one. Modern wood stoves come in various sizes, designs, and finishes and not all of them will be a good fit for your mancave. The first thing to consider is the size of your woodstove which will depend on how much space you have in your mancave and your heating needs. You want a stove that is big enough to meet your heating needs but not too big that it makes your mancave uncomfortably warm or takes up too much room. Another thing to consider is the stove's clearance rating, which is the minimum distance you should maintain between the stove and nearby walls, furniture, and appliances. You must also consider the design of the woodstove and how it fits in with the overall design or theme of your mancave. Whatever you end up choosing, make sure that it is certified by the Environmental Protection Agency. 

A woodstove could be the thing that is missing in your mancave to take it to the next level. Not only will it make your mancave warm and cozy but it can also add to the aesthetic appeal and make it feel more homely. But, to be on the safe side, make sure your installation is done by certified professionals who'll follow safety guidelines to the letter. 

Pest such as cockroaches, rodents, and ants can make their way into your home from many sources, and it is important to keep your home sealed against them to avoid health consequences and discomfort. Pest types vary according to state and some years are worse than others - for instance, 2018 year saw flies, ants, and mosquitoes plague people in 41 states, with around 34% of people seeking professional solutions. Proper installation of fireplaces will help reduce the risk of pests entering your home in warm and cold seasons alike but you can take additional steps to keep your home 100% pest-free. 

Installing a Fireplace Door

A fireplace door that is resistant to heat can be completely shut when your fire isn’t burning. This is key during winter, since small animals and rodents can seek warmth in homes, making an entryway though your chimney. Installing a door will make your home considerably less interesting, and you can keep rodents completely out by shutting the chimney once the embers are no longer aflame.

Organize Your Firewood

If you have a large storage space for your firewood, ensure that the logs are organized according to the date of acquisition. Make sure to burn the oldest logs first, since insects have a greater likelihood of producing a sizable colony in old wood. Be particularly strict with log use if you live with people with allergies and respiratory conditions. Toxic pests can trigger asthma and other allergies. In fact, around one third of people with other allergies are also allergic to cockroaches. Symptoms of exposure include everything from chest pain to wheezing. To keep these issues at bay, ensure that logs are neatly and clearly stored so that everyone in the family knows where they should be taking wood from when they wish to start a fire.

Buy Recently Cut Wood

Unless you cut wood yourself, buy wood cut in the recent months to ensure it is fresh and pest-free. If supply of fresh wood is low, consider contacting local logging companies, tree services, and professionals in the reclaimed lumber industry. Check wood before you bring it indoors, ensuring that beetles, carpenter ants, and termites are absent. Bring wood in at the moment you will be burning it, to avoid insects infesting other items of furniture in your home. 

Store Wood Optimally

You should store wood far from the fireplace; ideally, all wood should be stored outdoors. Aim to store wood off the ground, to reduce the amount of moisture buildup in the wood. To achieve this goal, consider storing wood atop a makeshift table made of bricks or concrete blocks. To ensure bringing logs to and fro is easy, invest in a log trolley. These are available for $30 or less and can be considered a small investment in your back health. Free reclaimed wood is sometimes available from excavating companies, owners of old barns, remodelling contractors and the like. 

Insects and rodents can make their way into your fireplace either through old logs or through the chimney. Fireplace doors and chimney flues will keep rodents out, while using new wood and storing logs outside will ensure insects do not infest your home. Pests can have a big effect on your family’s health and this is especially true for those with asthma and other allergies. The good news is that being vigilant and organized will reduce the chances of a home infestation to zero.

More than 50% of homes in America have a mold problem, according to This Old House. While it’s common for bathrooms, kitchens and bedrooms to develop a mold problem, homeowners rarely consider looking for it in their chimney and fireplace. However, moldy chimneys and fireplaces are more common than you think, and could be the reason for the musty smell in your home, so it’s crucial you get rid of it once and for all.

Getting to the root cause

There are several different parts of your chimney that could be to blame for mold growth. As a general rule, it could be one of four things causing the mold:

  • A lack of ventilation
  • A damaged chimney crown
  • The brick and mortar
  • A damaged chimney cap

Mold occurs in damp and cold places, so when there’s poor ventilation, any damp that does get in has nowhere to go and causes mold. If the chimney crown or chimney cap fail, this can add to the amount of moisture that gets into your chimney, thus worsening the problem. Meanwhile failing to waterproof the brick and mortar that sits within the chimney allows an increasing amount of water to build up, and will quickly lead to mold growth.

Clean up operation

When you suspect that mold has taken over your chimney and fireplace, you should cease using it and arrange for it to be cleaned. If there’s just a small amount of mold visible then you can clean it with an anti-fungal spray and a scrubbing brush. However, it’s best to call in an expert mold cleaning service, as with a chimney, you can never be sure how far the mold has spread or the true extent of the problem. To tackle mold fully, a mold remediation company will thoroughly inspect, assess, and test your chimney and fireplace. From there, they’ll treat the mold with an anti-microbial system, before checking that the mold hasn’t spread further around your home.

Solving the problem

Once the mold from your chimney and fireplace have been professionally removed, you’ll find that your home will instantly smell better. To ensure that things stay this way, you’ll need to tackle the root cause of the problem. This means replacing any faulty parts of your chimney, installing adequate ventilation, and damp-sealing all the bricks and mortar in and around the chimney. It’s also a wise idea to have your chimney professionally inspected annually. An inspection will identify any damp problems early on so that you can take action to remedy them before the mold returns and ruins the inside of the chimney, emitting that annoying musty odor.

Just like any part of your home, your chimney and fireplace are susceptible to damp and mold problems. But there’s no need to worry if you do suspect that mold is invading your chimney, as it’s simple enough to remove it. And, so long as you take preventative action to keep it at bay for good, you won’t have to deal with again.

We spend, on average, roughly 90% of our time indoors, where concentrations of pollutants can be up to five times higher than they are outdoors. For those of us burning wood indoors, this can be particularly concerning, but the good news is that by using a wood stove rather than an open fireplace, you’re already breathing in far fewer pollutants, and many of the steps you take to keep your stove eco-friendly will also help minimize the level of pollutants in your home. That said, it’s important to be aware of the effects of wood smoke and what you can do to improve your indoor air quality when you use a wood stove.

The Effects Of Burning Wood In The Home

When we breathe in wood smoke, we inhale pollutants and small particles, which can cause irritation to the lungs and eyes, and exacerbate breathing difficulties like bronchitis and asthma. Heavy exposure in the long term can lead to heart difficulties and reduced lung function, particularly in infants and older adults. 

There are a few steps you can take to reduce the amount of toxins you breathe in from wood smoke. Improving filtration and ventilation is key, as this exchanges stale air for fresh air. Air conditioning systems filter indoor air to remove airborne particles, and some also act as air purifiers - make sure you understand the parts and functions of your unit, and install air purifiers if yours doesn’t have one. Clean HEPA filters regularly, and monitor the air quality with an indoor air monitor, which will alert you if there’s a reduction of the quality of the air in your home.  

Keep Your Wood Stove Clean And Well-Maintained

Ensure that your wood stove is certified by the EPA - modern stoves are cleaner and more efficient, and this certification is required, but if you’re using a very old stove, it may be time to upgrade. Modern stoves burn less wood than older stoves, and reduce the amount of wood smoke emitted.

Ensure that any air leaks are sealed and insulated, and have your stove serviced regularly. The chimney, too, should be swept once a year to clear out creosote and pollutants. As well as keeping your air quality at its best, this will ensure the safety of your stove.

Using Your Stove For Optimum Air Quality

To keep pollutants to a minimum, burn only dry, natural wood. Damp wood doesn’t burn as easily, and will produce much more smoke, as well as generating less heat. Stack split wood off the ground for six months to a year to season it, keeping it covered with plenty of room for air flow. Cracking at the ends of the logs will show you when the wood is dry. Dry wood should also make a hollow sound when two logs are knocked against each other. You can use a moisture meter to check that the wood is dry enough - moisture content should have dropped to 15-20% before burning. 

When you’re building your fire, stack larger logs at the bottom, followed by smaller logs topped with sticks or wood chips. When you’re lighting the stove, light the top of the pile. Keep the fire hot, as this produces a cleaner fire with little visible smoke. 

Because a wood stove keeps the fire contained, it causes far less problems for indoor air quality than an open fireplace. However, in order to keep the air quality of your home as clean as possible, it’s important to keep your stove well maintained and pay attention to the moisture content of the wood you’re burning. Doing this will also reduce the stove’s environmental impact, and keep it burning at its most efficient level.

Biomass Stove Tax Credit Extended to December 31, 2020

Tax credits are powerful incentives for potentially hesitant consumers to invest in new biomass-fueled freestanding stoves and energy conservation technology. For nearly a decade,

HPBA has worked in Washington, D.C. to maintain a tax credit for purchasers of new biomass stoves so that communities and individuals can reap the financial and environmental benefits that newer, more efficient technology provides. 

UPDATE: In late December 2019, the biomass stove tax credit was extended for qualifying purchases made before December 31, 2020. Remind consumers that they are able to claim the credit on their 2018 and 2019 returns if they made a qualifying purchase in those tax years. 

HPBA continues to fight for another extension of this important incentive for consumers to invest in cleaner, more efficient technology. 

Industry Specific FAQs

When does this tax credit go into effect and how long will it last?

This tax credit is valid only for the purchase and installation of a qualifying biomass stove made before December 31, 2020. Consumers would claim the tax credit in the year in which it was purchased.

What is the Biomass Stove Tax Credit? What products qualify?

This federal tax credit is an opportunity for the hearth industry to promote energy-conscious purchases to consumers that improve the energy efficiency of their home. It is a $300 dollar-for-dollar, non-refundable, tax credit for purchasing a qualifying biomass-burning stove before December 31, 2020. Biomass simply means the stove uses wood or pellet fuel.

Any biomass appliance that meets or exceeds an energy efficiency rating of 75 percent qualifies for this credit. This credit applies to qualifying stoves that heat the air or water. However, visit your local specialty retailer who can explain which products qualify for the tax credit. Manufacturers must provide documentation proving in some way that the appliance qualifies for the credit.

What Does the IRS Say? 

Energy-efficient building property (covered by this credit includes) a stove that uses the burning of biomass fuel to heat your home or heat water for your home that has a thermal efficiency rating of at least 75%. 

What must a manufacturer's certification statement contain?

A manufacturer's certification statement must contain the following information: 

  • The name and address of the manufacturer.
  • Identification of the class of qualified energy property (Biomass-Burning Stove) in which the property is included.
  • The make, model number and any other appropriate identifiers of the stove.
  • A statement that the product is an eligible qualified energy property.
  • A manufacturer's certification statement must contain a declaration, signed by a person currently authorized to bind the manufacturer in these matters, in the following form: "Under penalties of perjury, I declare that I have examined this certification statement, and to the best of my knowledge and belief, the facts are true, correct, and complete."

If a customer claimed this tax credit in past years, may they claim it again this year?

Yes, but only if they haven't reached the credit claim cap of $500. That said, if consumers are in your store looking to update their appliance, there may be stove accessories that you could recommend to enhance their experience (even if they aren't eligible for the tax credit).

What Does the IRS Say?

If the total of any non-business energy property credits you have taken in the previous years (after 2015) is more than $500, you generally cannot take the credit. 

Why was 75 percent efficiency selected?

The 75 percent efficiency number was originally designated by the U.S. Congress in 2008 as part of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act and was used again for this tax credit.

Does the stove need to be manufactured in the U.S. to qualify for the credit?

No, there is no "Buy America" component to this tax credit.

What should a retailer advise the customer retain for tax purposes?

Retailers and consumers must keep exact records of any sale or purchase. Retailers should provide a consumer with the manufacturer's certification statement for the specific product model purchased. A consumer may rely on a manufacturer's certification statement that their products are qualified energy property. A taxpayer is not required to attach the certification statement to the return on which the credit is claimed. A consumer claiming a credit for the qualified non-business energy property should retain the certification statement as part of the taxpayer's records.

Manufacturers should make this certification document available to consumers on their website, in the product packaging, or in some other easily accessible manner.

What Does the IRS Say?

For purposes of taking the credit, you can rely on a manufacturer’s certification in writing that a product is qualified residential energy property. Do not attach the certification to your return. Keep it for your records.

With 8.8 million households in the United States using wood stoves as a secondary source for heating, regular maintenance and cleaning of the appliance is a necessity for many people nationwide. However, many wood stove owners may not be familiar with the importance of cleaning their stoves, how to do it, or when to let a professional step in. Whether you’ve just installed a wood stove in preparation for winter or you’ve had one for some time, here are some of the basics about care and cleaning that you should know.

The importance of proper care

While cleaning your wood stove might sound redundant (until it becomes noticeable), it’s an important part of owning a wood stove that should never be overlooked. This is because an unclean stove — including both the chimney and flue — can not only prevent it from working properly, but can easily become a fire hazard due to the build-up of creosote, which also makes it a health hazard as well. With that said, the cleaning and proper care of your wood stove are necessary for proper efficiency and safety, as regular maintenance can help keep your stove in an ideal condition that doesn't harm anyone's health.

Cleaning your stove 

While how often your wood stove gets cleaned depends upon how often it’s used, it should still be done at least once a year. When it does need to be cleaned, always begin with the stove completely cold in order to avoid burning yourself. Then, you can scoop out the ashes with an ash shovel and wire brush and put them in a metal bucket. Next, scour the buildup and rust off with a wire brush. The exterior of the stove can easily be cleaned with a vinegar solution and rag. As for the glass, a cold piece of charcoal can easily rub away any soot, and after you wipe it with a paper towel, you’ll find that it’s clean. However, when it comes to cleaning more complicated aspects of your stove — like the chimney and flue — calling a professional can be a good idea.

When to call a professional

Calling a professional to clean your stove is never a bad idea, especially if you don’t feel comfortable with cleaning the stove yourself or don’t have the proper equipment to do so safely. Professionals can ensure that your stove is properly and safely cleaned, inspected, and safe for use. Many may use high tech equipment as well, which can be expensive to buy and hard to obtain for personal use. Thus, calling a professional can prove to be a quality and convenient service for wood stove owners, in addition to bringing peace of mind and reducing stress surrounding the issue.

While it’s definitely possible to clean your wood stove yourself, it’s necessary to be informed of the several safety precautions to take when doing so. For example, when disposing of the ashes, it’s necessary to do so properly by keeping them in a metal bucket for 24 hours (in case they contain any live coals). It’s also very important to take care when cleaning the chimney in order to prevent falling off the roof. Due to the extent of safety precautions needed, utilizing a professional is always a great idea. 

Cleaning your wood stove and keeping up with its maintenance is an absolute necessity in order to keep it working properly and safely. While many may call a professional to do so, others may choose to take care of it themselves. No matter the situation, it’s important to be aware of the safety precautions involved.

Winter is just around the corner, which means that an increasing number of Americans will start their preparations for the colder weather.  While many households make use of electric or gas heating sources, as many as 4.8 million homes use a wood stove, according to the U.S. Energy Information Agency. Despite rendering exceptional heat and being very economical, many homeowners wonder whether wood stoves affect indoor air quality. Although excess smoke can pose a problem, there are a number of ways to ensure that your wood stove is as safe and eco-friendly as possible in its maintenance and usage.  

Use dry wood

Dry wood not only creates substantially hotter fires but less smoke as well. Where possible, collect your wood, chop it, and leave it to air dry for at least a year before using it. This will not only result in a reduction in indoor air pollution but also save you money as no heat will be wasted on evaporation. You can make your fires even more eco-friendly by collecting branches and trees that have already fallen or using wood that would otherwise have been destined for the landfill. You can even try and source offcuts from your local joiner or sawmill but take care to not use anything that has been painted or treated in any way.

Allow enough air to circulate

If you want the air inside your home to be as clean as possible you need to ensure that there is adequate ventilation. Apart from making use of a sound chimney system, you also need to make sure that there is no furniture blocking the vents. You should also consider opening a window or two a bit in order to have fresh air enter the home while letting any excess smoke and gas emissions escape. Take care not to open your windows too much, however, as you don’t want all the lovely heat your stove is generating, to escape.  

Give your stove and chimney some TLC

One of the simplest ways to make your wood stove more environmentally-friendly is to keep both the stove and your chimney well-maintained.  Remove creosote build-up from your stove on a regular basis with a special detergent and limit future build-up by only making fires with seasoned, dry wood. Your chimney is a very important component of your wood stove.  Apart from posing a fire risk, a chimney that is filled with soot and creosote can also leave the house filled with an unpleasant smoke. In order for a chimney to remain clean, it has to be thoroughly inspected and swept at least two times a year.

A wood stove can be a great addition to any home, especially during the colder months. As long as you take the necessary steps to combat any indoor air pollution as much as possible, you will be able to enjoy the wonderful heat omitted by your stove without suffering from any adverse effects. 

Seniors over the age of 65 are three times more likely to be injured or lose their life in a home fire than younger people. Home fires are more likely to occur during the winter, when various heating methods are being used. Wood stoves create a pleasant atmosphere, heat the home well, and are commonly seen in senior’s homes, but they can present risks. If you have family, such as elderly parents, who are vulnerable and use a wood stove, there are some precautions you can take to help keep them safe and give yourself some peace of mind.

Regular maintenance and cleaning

Regularly maintaining and cleaning wood stoves can help to keep older relatives safe. Ideally, this should be done by a professional who can also inspect the flue for any problems, and make sure that everything is working as it should. Creosote can build up in the wood stove and chimney, and will need cleaning thoroughly. This should be done at the end of each winter, or whenever your loved ones are done using their wood stove for the year, and at least once during the winter while it’s being regularly used. You may need to arrange regular maintenance for seniors in case they forget or are unaware that it needs doing. 

Prioritize safety

Safety should always come before anything else when warming the home. In some circumstances, the risks that a wood stove presents outweigh the benefits, and opting for alternative heating solutions can be a better option. For example, a senior with dementia may leave their wood stove unattended or play with it out of confusion, or they may have a physical illness, like arthritis, that makes it difficult for them to manage a wood stove. If they live with someone else who can take responsibility for the wood stove then it’s not as big of a problem, but for seniors living at home alone it’s important for their loved ones to assess the risks and how safely their wood stove can be used. Assistive technology can give you peace of mind if your loved one lives alone, as they can call for help easily if something goes wrong while they're using the stove.

Precautions family can take to protect seniors

There are plenty of things loved ones can do to reduce the risk of a fire or injuries from a wood stove. Placing it on a fire-resistant base will reduce the chance of hardwood or carpeted floors becoming hot and catching fire. Ensuring any wood used for burning is dry and well-seasoned, which usually takes about two years, helps to minimize the amount of creosote and tar that builds up in the wood stove and chimney, as well as reducing the amount of smoke produced. Logs should be kept away from the wood stove, as stacking them next to it can increase the chance of a fire. Seniors may benefit from having a fireguard in place to reduce the risk of them falling into the fire or the temptation to go near it. This can be particularly helpful if someone else in the home is responsible for the wood stove and there’s no need for seniors to touch it at all.

Seniors can safely use and enjoy their wood stove to warm their homes, but loved ones can take some precautions and follow basic safety tips to reduce any risks and give themselves peace of mind throughout the winter.

65% of Americans prefer to workout at home than at a local gym. Having a home gym is convenient and can be purpose-built to suit your fitness needs and, with the addition of some luxury features, can help you to de-stress and relax at the end of the day, too. Nothing says luxury like a home gym that’s fully outfitted. By incorporating an extensive range of fitness equipment, a hot tub by a warming patio heater, and a room dedicated to yoga where you can meditate by a cozy fireplace, your home gym can be a truly relaxing and luxurious retreat for boosting your health and wellness.

Choosing the right fitness equipment for you

Kitting your home fitness room out should be done to your needs, rather than buying equipment that you think should be in a gym but that you have no intention of using. If you enjoy jogging outside for cardio and want a home gym for weight training then prioritize free weights and weight machines. Similarly, if your goal is to shed some pounds and improve your fitness, then you should look into some cardio machines. Elliptical trainers, treadmills, and exercise bikes are all good options that allow you to have variation with your workouts. Having a television or sound system can provide you with some entertainment and motivation while you’re working out, so consider installing these, too.

Adding a touch of luxury and relaxation 

One of the perks of a gym membership is that you can get additional features, such as hot tubs, access to a pool, and saunas. If you’ve got the space, then adding some of these touches to your home fitness suite can be well worth it. Not only can they help you to relax after a long day at work, but it can also help with recovery times after intense exercise. Having an outdoor pool and installing a hot tub area with it can be an option if you don’t have space indoors. Including a cozy outdoor fire or patio heater can make the space feel even more inviting and you’ll be more likely to use it in colder months and in the evenings too.

Creating a cozy yoga area

Perhaps all you want from your fitness room is somewhere warm, cozy, and relaxing where you can practice yoga, pilates, or meditation. Creating an ambiance will be an important part of this and a fireplace can be a great feature that helps to warm the room too. Space is key, so keep either a whole room or a small part of your fitness room free from bulky equipment and away from noise. Calming music, scented candles, and dimmed lights can be all you need. Basic equipment, such as a yoga mat, pilates balance ball, and resistance bands can be kept nearby for the days you feel like mixing up your workouts.

A fitness room in your home can be a great investment that adds some real luxury to your home. For cozy and relaxing spaces, fireplaces can significantly contribute to the ambiance, as well as being a great focal point that makes any space feel inviting.

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